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MASTER INTERNET SAFETY CHECKLIST [MISC]

Cyber Attack Prevention | Internet Safety

Master Internet Safety Checklist [MISC]: Below is a compilation of 220 cyber attack prevention and internet safety checklist items compiled from  random items taken from the iPredator Internet Safety Checklist Collection (IISC) developed by iPredator Inc. founder, Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D. Given that most online users will not find all the checklist segments applicable to their lifestyle, the goal is to correctly score 90% or better. The MISC is broken down into 11 categories with 20 statements per category. Get 190 correct and you are an internet safety savvy master.

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CHECKLIST DIRECTIONS

iPredator Internet Safety Checklists (IISC)

1. To complete the checklist, you are required to respond to each statement with 1 of 4 choices as follows:

  • A. Y__ (Yes, Agree, True)
  • B. N__ (No, Disagree, False)
  • C. IDK__ (I Do Not Know, I Did Not Know, I Am Unsure)
  • D. DNA__ (Does Not Apply, Not Applicable, Not Relevant)

3. Only answer “Yes” or “No” to statements you are positive about or almost certain in your decision with minimal doubt.

4. If there is a statement you do not understand, respond with choice D. DNA__ (Does Not Apply, Not Applicable, Not Relevant).

5. If there is a statement that does not apply to you or the subject being queried, respond with choice D. DNA__ (Does Not Apply, Not Applicable, Not Relevant). For example, if a checklist statement discusses mobile devices, but you do not own a mobile device, you would respond with choice D. (Does Not Apply, Not Applicable or Not Relevant).

Prior to taking the checklist, please review the two definitions listed below and refer back to them as needed. The definition of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) and iPredator is as follows:

Information and Communications Technology (ICT)

ICT: Information and Communications Technology (ICT) is an umbrella term used to define any electronic or digital communication device or application used to obtain, exchange or disseminate information. ICT stresses the role of unified communications and the integration of telecommunications, which enable users to create access, store, transmit and manipulate information. ICT consists of all forms of telecommunication, information technology, broadcast media, audio and video processing, transmission and network based control and monitoring functions. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) is a concept incorporating all electronic and digital forms of communication.

iPredator

iPredator:  A person, group or nation who, directly or indirectly, engages in exploitation, victimization, coercion, stalking, theft or disparagement of others using Information and Communications Technology [ICT]. iPredators are driven by deviant fantasies, desires for power and control, retribution, religious fanaticism, political reprisal, psychiatric illness, perceptual distortions, peer acceptance or personal and financial gain. iPredators can be any age or gender and are not bound by economic status, race, religion or national heritage. iPredator is a global term used to distinguish anyone who engages in criminal, coercive, deviant or abusive behaviors using ICT. Central to the construct is the premise that Information Age criminals, deviants and the violently disturbed are psychopathological classifications new to humanity.

Whether the offender is a cyberstalker, cyber harasser, cybercriminal, online sexual predator, internet troll, cyber terrorist, cyberbully, online child pornography consumer/distributor or engaged in internet defamation or nefarious online deception, they fall within the scope of iPredator. The three criteria used to define an iPredator include:

  • A self-awareness of causing harm to others, directly or indirectly, using ICT.
  • The usage of ICT to obtain, exchange and deliver harmful information.
  • A general understanding of Cyberstealth used to engage in criminal or deviant activities or to profile, identify, locate, stalk and engage a target.

Unlike human predators prior to the Information Age, iPredators rely upon the multitude of benefits offered by Information and Communications Technology [ICT]. These assistances include exchange of information over long distances, rapidity of information exchanged and the seemingly infinite access to data available. Malevolent in intent, iPredators habitually deceive others using ICT in the abstract and artificial electronic universe known as cyberspace. Therefore, as the internet naturally offers all ICT users anonymity, if they decide, iPredators actively design online profiles and diversionary tactics to remain undetected and untraceable.

Cyberstealth, a sub-tenet of iPredator, is a covert method by which iPredators attempt to establish and sustain complete anonymity while they engage in ICT activities planning their next assault, investigating innovative surveillance technologies or researching the social profiles of their next target. Concurrent with the concept of Cyberstealth is iPredator Victim Intuition [IVI], an iPredator’s IVI is their aptitude to sense a target’s ODDOR [Offline Distress Dictates Online Response], online & offline vulnerabilities, psychological weaknesses, technological limitations, increasing their success of a cyber-attack with minimal ramifications.

All the checklists are designed to assess the subject’s internet safety acumen, cyber attack awareness, cyber security practices and general understanding of knowing how to protect oneself in today’s digital device environment. Scoring well does not require the respondent to be an advanced information technology professional. If anything, being advanced in electronic devices can give some a false sense of security. Few people score 95% and higher on their first attempt as we are all living at the beginning of a new model called, the Information Age. Michael Nuccitelli Psy.D., iPredator Inc.

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AISC

ADULT INTERNET SAFETY CHECKLIST

(correct responses are yes, true or agree)

  • 1. Your email addresses, instant messaging usernames and links to personal homepages cannot be connected to your home address or exact identity.
  • 2. You do not announce your physical location via status updates on GPS-enabled applications.
  • 3. You never leave a logged in computer unattended for extended periods.
  • 4. You know what “digital footprint” means and actively monitor it.
  • 5. You have not shared private information to a now ex-friend or ex-intimate partner online.
  • 6. You practice caution what you share or post online.
  • 7. You protect all your online images from strangers being able to view or download them.
  • 8. You have segmented your personal life from your work or career persona as a digital reputation control measure.
  • 9. You know what digital reputation means and monitor ICT to make sure you have a positive digital reputation.
  • 10. You know your images can stay in cyberspace for years and information you post or share online may be impossible to delete.
  • 11. You have a mobile device or phone that does not have information that is embarrassing and/or sensitive.
  • 12. You are careful about posting your personal information online and know why it is important related to your digital reputation.
  • 13. You refrain from “sexting” and know it can be criminal if the subject being “sexted” about is a minor.
  • 14. You have not shared private information to a now ex-friend online and concerned about what they will do.
  • 15. You work to have a positive “digital reputation” or know how to create a positive “digital reputation.”
  • 16. You know the images and videos you post online can stay in cyberspace for years.
  • 17. You know sensitive and/or sexual information you share online may be impossible to delete.
  • 18. You know “sexting” involving you or friends can be shared with others without your consent.
  • 19. You know not to have sexual conversations with someone you met online.
  • 20. You always review the privacy and security settings at social media sites (i.e. Facebook, MySpace) you have joined.

BISC

BUSINESS INTERNET SAFETY CHECKLIST

(correct responses are yes, true or agree)

  • 1. The business is ICT safe from hackers and checked regularly for updates.
  • 2. The business is ICT safe from viruses and checked regularly for updates.
  • 3. The business is ICT safe from malware and checked regularly for updates.
  • 4. The business is ICT safe from a mobile device cyber-security breach and checked regularly for updates.
  • 5. The business has a formal written internet security policy.
  • 6. The business engages in internet safety training.
  • 7. The business’s ICT get automatic software and security updates.
  • 8. The business knows what is needed to prevent a security breach of sensitive information.
  • 9. The business protects sensitive company data on mobile devices.
  • 10. The business monitors how employees interact with social media.
  • 11. The business checks for new cybercrime protection products and services.
  • 12. The business monitors sensitive online information and knows the value to a cyber criminal.
  • 13. The business knows the consequences of using the Internet in an unsafe way.
  • 14. The business tracks social networking sites employees visit during downtime at the job location.
  • 15. The business is educated on safe online practices.
  • 16. The business diversifies the company ICT passwords.
  • 17. The business knows how to combat the latest cyber threats.
  • 18. The business is safe from a loss of data.
  • 19. The business is safe from customer and financial information theft.
  • 20. The business is safe from loss of employee or financial data.

CBAC

CYBER BULLY ABUSER CHECKLIST

(correct responses are no, false or disagree)

  • 1. Peers and/or adults have described the child/student as impulsive.
  • 2. Peers and/or adults have described the child/student as hotheaded.
  • 3. Peers and/or adults have described the child/student having a dominant personality.
  • 4. Peers and/or adults have described the child/student lacking empathy.
  • 5. Peers and/or adults have described the child/student having difficulty conforming to rules.
  • 6. Peers and/or adults have described the child/student having a low frustration tolerance.
  • 7. Peers and/or adults have described the child/student having a positive attitude toward violence.
  • 8. Peers and/or adults have described the child/student being physically aggressive.
  • 9. Peers and/or adults have described the child/student as gradually decreasing their interest in school.
  • 10. The child/student has reported to peers or adults a lack of parental warmth and involvement.
  • 11. The child/student has reported to peers or adults their parents being overly permissive.
  • 12. The child/student has reported to peers or adults their parents being excessively harsh with discipline.
  • 13. The child/student has reported to peers or adults their parents being excessively harsh with physical punishment.
  • 14. The child/student has been reported by peers or adults to not identify with the emotions or feelings of others.
  • 15. The child/student has reported to peers or adults a positive attitude toward violence.
  • 16. The child/student has been exposed to models of bullying/cyber bullying.
  • 17. In school, the child/student has been reported by peers or adults as having a lack of supervision during breaks.
  • 18. In school, the child/student has been reported by peers or adults as having unsupervised interactions between different grade levels during breaks.
  • 19. The child/student has been reported by peers or adults to be indifferent towards teacher attitudes on bullying/cyber bullying.
  • 20. The child/student has been reported by peers or adults to be indifferent towards student attitudes on bullying/cyber bullying.

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CBTC

CYBER BULLY TARGET CHECKLIST

(correct responses are no, false or disagree)

  • 1. The child/student has reported to peers or adults being taunted online.
  • 2. The child/student has reported to peers or adults being maliciously teased online.
  • 3. The child/student has reported to peers or adults being joked about by others online.
  • 4. The child/student has reported to peers or adults being repeatedly teased about their physical attributes by others online.
  • 5. The child/student has reported to peers or adults being repeatedly teased about their race or religious faith by others online.
  • 6. The child/student has reported to peers or adults being sexually teased by others online.
  • 7. The child/student has reported to peers or adults having their personal belongings taken by others who tease them online.
  • 8. The child/student has reported to peers or adults having rumors spread about them online.
  • 9. The child/student has reported to peers or adults having been socially excluded by others online.
  • 10. The child/student has reported to peers or adults being a victim of extortion online.
  • 11. The child/student has reported to peers or adults being a victim of repeated intimidation online.
  • 12. Peers or adults have described the child/student as lacking social support from others online.
  • 13. Peers or adults have described the child/student as having minimal means of support during cyberbullying episodes.
  • 14. Peers or adults have described the child/student as being rejected within their established peer group online.
  • 15. Peers or adults have described the child/student as being non-aggressive and often shy shown by their ICT activities.
  • 16. Peers or adults have described the child/student as having difficulty being proactive against being teased or harassed online.
  • 17. The child/student has reported less likely reporting being cyberbullied given they perceive their school or classroom is tolerant of bullying.
  • 18. The child/student has reported to peers or adults being unable to appropriately handle cyberbullying situations whether they are the victim or a bystander.
  • 19. The child/student has reported to peers or adults their school does not have an open-door policy for all students.
  • 20. The child/student has reported to peers or adults their school does not clearly identify adults to whom cyberbullying incidents are reported.

CCPC

CYBER CRIME PROTECTION CHECKLIST

(correct responses are yes, true or agree)

  • 1. All Information and Communications Technology is safe from hackers and checked regularly for updates.
  • 2. All Information and Communications Technology is safe from viruses and checked regularly for updates.
  • 3. All Information and Communications Technology is safe from malware and checked regularly for updates.
  • 4. All Information and Communications Technology is safe from a mobile device cyber security breach and checked regularly for updates.
  • 5. You, your loved ones or business have a formal or informal written Internet security plan.
  • 6. You, your loved ones or business participates in Internet safety training or education.
  • 7. All Information and Communications Technology gets automatic software and security
  • updates.
  • 8. You, your loved ones or business regularly inspects what information you have and what is needed to protect it.
  • 9. You, your loved ones or business regularly inspects how to store and protect data on mobile devices.
  • 10. You, your loved ones or business do not share personal information on social networking sites.
  • 11. You, your loved ones or business regularly assesses what new privacy settings you may need at social networking sites.
  • 12. You, your loved ones or business are aware of the information you put online and the potential value to a cyber criminal or cyber terrorist.
  • 13. You, your loved ones or business review bank and credit card statements regularly.
  • 14. You, your loved ones or business is aware of what websites and social networking sites are being visited during downtime at the workplace or at your home.
  • 15. You, your loved ones or business are educated on safe online practices.
  • 16. You, your loved ones or business have up to date antivirus software that monitors viruses, worms and other types of malicious programs.
  • 17. You, your loved ones or business are ready to combat the latest cyber threats.
  • 18. You, your loved ones or business are safe from a loss of data and checked regularly.
  • 19. You, your loved ones or business are safe from loss of customer or personal information and regularly inspected.
  • 20. You, your loved ones or business have guidelines or rules on how long to store online documents.

CSPC

CYBER STALKING PREVENTION CHECKLIST

(correct responses are yes, true or agree)

  • 1. You, your child, a loved one or employee ignore being “flamed” (provocative or angry online message.)
  • 2. You, your child, a loved one or employee has a genderless screen name.
  • 3. You, a loved one or employee post minimal personal information online.
  • 4. You, your child, a loved one or employee knows your state cyberstalking, cyberbullying and cyber harassment laws.
  • 5. You, your child, a loved one or employee refrain from posting a home address online.
  • 6. You, your child, a loved one or employee password protects all ICT with secure passwords that are difficult to guess.
  • 7. You, your child, a loved one or employee regularly change passwords and secret questions on all ICT accounts.
  • 8. You, your child, a loved one or employee are always suspicious of incoming emails, telephone calls or text messages that ask for personal identifying information.
  • 9. You, your child, a loved one or employee never gives out a Social Security Number or financial information to unknown online entities.
  • 10. You, your child, a loved one or employee use stat counters to record all incoming traffic to your blogs and websites.
  • 11. You, your child, a loved one or employee regularly check the status of your credit reports about online transactions.
  • 12. You, your child, a loved one or employee have computers and mobile devices regularly checked for spyware.
  • 13. You, your child, a loved one or employee refrains from sharing contact information in e-mail, IM, text, Twitter and chat room messages.
  • 14. You, your child, a loved one or employee are extremely cautious about meeting online acquaintances in person.
  • 15. You, your child, a loved one or employee makes sure your ISP and Internet Relay Chat (IRC) networks have an acceptable use policy prohibiting cyberstalking.
  • 16. You, your child, a loved one or employee know to log off and contact local law enforcement if a situation online becomes hostile.
  • 17. You, your child, a loved one or employee know to save all communications for evidence if cyberstalked or harassed.
  • 18. You, your child, a loved one or employee know to keep records of contacts with internet system administrators and law enforcement if cyberstalked or harassed.
  • 19. You, your child, a loved one or employee know how to block or filter messages from a potential cyberstalker or harasser.
  • 20. You, your child, a loved one or employee know to report a cyberstalker or harasser to an Internet Service Provider (ISP.)

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DRPC

DIGITAL REPUTATION PROTECTION CHECKLIST

(correct responses are yes, true or agree)

  • 1. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) consistently monitor and manage the ICT user or business’s digital reputation.
  • 2. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) set screen saver passwords to lock ICT systems when not in use.
  • 3. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) set security settings on high, use at least one firewall and limit downloads to essential items from reputable sources.
  • 4. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) manage your browser settings, dump cookie and search history caches regularly.
  • 5. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) monitors and ensures sensitive information does not belong to mobile devices or computers that hook up to the Internet.
  • 6. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) monitors and ensures that sensitive personal information is never available on a work or employer’s machine.
  • 7. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) has set up free e-mail accounts to protect yourself or your business from being impersonated.
  • 8. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) have segmented your personal life from your work or career persona as a reputation damage control measure.
  • 9. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) have set up a minimum of 4 free e-mail accounts for your friends/family, financial issues, business contacts and when anyone not in the priority categories asks for an e-mail address.
  • 10. Each email for you, your loved ones or business has a different set of passwords and security questions.
  • 11. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) have segmented your personal life from your work or career persona from your social media persona (i.e. Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, Twitter).
  • 12. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) consistently update, monitor and manage your blog or website.
  • 13. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) consistently make sure to link to reputable sources and create content .
  • 14. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) consistently post on related sites in yours and/or the business’s field.
  • 15. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) are familiar with Search Engine Optimization, Search Engine Marketing & Social Media Optimization to make sure posted material from your blog or website ranks high in search engines.
  • 16. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) have a digital reputation damage plan.
  • 17. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) have researched, aggregated and created reputation management strategies for all potential information damaging scenarios.
  • 18. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) conduct scheduled “Advanced Google Search” and have set up “Google Alerts” with the name of the ICT user or the business.
  • 19. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) regularly conduct scheduled searches of message boards.
  • 20. You, a consultant or assigned employee(s) regularly conduct scheduled searches of social media and social networking sites.

OPPC

ONLINE PREDATOR PREVENTION CHECKLIST

(correct responses are yes, true or agree)

  • 1. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows Internet sex crimes involving adults and children more often fit a model of statutory rape.
  • 2. An adult or primary caregiver uses developmentally appropriate prevention strategies to educate the child on romance and sex.
  • 3. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows how to recognize if the child has sexual orientation concerns or patterns of offline and online risk taking.
  • 4. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows the characteristics of Internet-initiated sex crimes.
  • 5. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows the stereotype of the iPredator using trickery and violence to assault children is largely inaccurate.
  • 6. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows most Internet sex crimes involve young adult men who seduce underage adolescents into sexual encounters.
  • 7. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows the majority of Internet sex crimes involve victims aware they are conversing online with adults.
  • 8. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows iPredators rarely deceive their victims about their sexual interests.
  • 9. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows most children who meet an iPredator face to face go to such meetings expecting to engage in sexual activity.
  • 10. The child is aware iPredators primarily deceive children using promises of love and romance, but their intentions are primarily sexual.
  • 11. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows most iPredators are charged with statutory rape involving non-forcible sexual activity with their victims.
  • 12. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows age-of-consent law violations are the most common sex crimes against minors in general.
  • 13. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows the majority of sex crimes against children are never reported to law enforcement.
  • 14. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows that Internet sex crimes pursued mostly by law enforcement involves adult offenders who are 10 or more years older than their underage victims.
  • 15. An adult or the child, if developmentally appropriate, knows they are experiencing or soon to experience adolescent sexual development with growing sexual curiosity.
  • 16. An adult or primary caregiver knows most early adolescent children are already aware of, thinking about and beginning to experiment with sex.
  • 17. An adult or primary caregiver is aware of mid-adolescence; most children have had romantic partners and absorbed by romantic concerns.
  • 18. The child is or will be educated on how Internet initiated sex crimes often involve greater self-disclosure and intensity than face-to-face relationships among peers.
  • 19. Relevant to a child’s online activity, an adult or primary caregiver is aware children often struggle with emotional control during their early to mid-teens.
  • 20. An adult or primary caregiver is aware the child and all children are vulnerable to seduction by iPredators due to immaturity, inexperience and the impulsiveness of exploring normal sexual urges.

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PISC

PEDIATRIC INTERNET SAFETY CHECKLIST

(correct responses are yes, true or agree)

  • 1. The child is familiar with the two main types of cyber bullying: direct and indirect attacks (a.k.a. cyberbullying by proxy,) confirmed by a parent or educator.
  • 2. In the last 90 days, no one has made a racial, sexist, sexual or derogatory statement about the child’s family online confirmed by a parent or educator.
  • 3. In the last 90 days, no one has posted a lie or false allegation about the child online confirmed by a parent or educator.
  • 4. In the last 90 days, no one has flamed (angry or provocative message) the child confirmed by a parent or educator.
  • 5. In the last 90 days, the child has not been cyberbullied confirmed by a parent or educator.
  • 6. In the last 90 days, no one the child knows has been cyberbullied confirmed by a parent or educator.
  • 7. The child has not sent, posted or received mean messages about others online confirmed by a parent or educator.
  • 8. In the last 6 months, the child has not had a friend or enemy spread rumors about them online confirmed by a parent or educator.
  • 9. In the last 6 months, the child has not had a friend or enemy disclose a secret about them online confirmed by a parent or educator.
  • 10. The child has never and knows to never tease or hurt anyone’s feelings online.
  • 11. The child knows what to do if they or a friend is cyberbullied.
  • 12. The child’s address and phone number are hidden from everyone other than trusting adults and/or close friends online.
  • 13. The child knows posting personal information online can hurt their reputation.
  • 14. The child has not shared private information to a new ex-friend or ex-romantic partner online.
  • 15. The child is careful what they tell others online, which you have verified through discussions or proof.
  • 16. The child protects their images from strangers viewing them online.
  • 17. The child has a positive digital reputation.
  • 18. The child knows their images and videos can stay in cyberspace for years.
  • 19. The child knows negative online information about them may be impossible to delete.
  • 20. The child does not have a mobile device (i.e. cellphone, smart phone) with information that is embarrassing.

TISC

TEEN INTERNET SAFETY CHECKLIST

(correct responses are yes, true or agree)

  • 1. If someone has been verbally abusive towards you online, you will tell your parents or a trusted adult.
  • 2. You have not been harassed or teased someone online and kept it a secret from your parents or a trusted adult.
  • 3. You have not been “flamed” online and kept it a secret from your parents or a trusted adult.
  • 4. You have not sent, posted or received mean messages about others and did not tell anyone.
  • 5. You have not had an online relationship go bad and you began teasing and/or harassing you.
  • 6. You have not had secrets you have posted or shared online spread by others and kept it a secret from your parents or a trusted adult.
  • 7. You know what to do if you or a friend is being teased, harassed or cyber bullied.
  • 8. You are careful about what you disclose to others online.
  • 9. You always protect your images and/or videos from online strangers from viewing them.
  • 10. You have not been harassed or teased online on the grounds of your race, religion, gender, sexuality or physical look.
  • 11. You have or would not retaliate to negative online information being spread about you.
  • 12. You are careful about posting your personal information online and know why it is important related to your digital reputation.
  • 13. You know what “digital footprint” means or how posting your personal information online can hurt your reputation.
  • 14. You have not shared private information to a now ex-friend online and concerned about what they will do.
  • 15. You work to have a positive “digital reputation” or know how to create a positive “digital reputation.”
  • 16. You know the images and videos you post online can stay in cyberspace for years.
  • 17. You know sensitive and/or sexual information you share online may be impossible to delete.
  • 18. You know “sexting” involving you or friends can be shared with others without your consent.
  • 19. You know not to have sexual conversations with someone you met online.
  • 20. You always review the privacy and security settings at social media sites (i.e. Facebook, MySpace) you have joined.

PCSC

PARENT CYBER SAFETY CHECKLIST

FROM HIGH RISK ICT ACTIVITY SECTION

(correct responses are yes, true or agree)

  • 1. Your child does not have sexual conversations with someone they met online.
  • 2. Your child has not had a Facebook or social networking account prior to age 13.
  • 3. Your child knows to disclose websites they have visited if requested by you or a trusted adult.
  • 4. Your child has not visited or been exposed to online sex sites.
  • 5. Your child does not use the Internet without supervision or an adult familiar with their online activities.
  • 6. Your child has not received or made phone calls to others you or a trusted adult does not know.
  • 7. Your child does not inform others online when an adult will not be home.
  • 8. Your child has not been contacted by an online stranger.
  • 9. Your child has not met anyone in person he or she met online.
  • 10. A teacher, parent or a trusted adult has not approached your child and they quickly shut off their computer.
  • 11. Your child does not respond to anyone they do not know in chat rooms.
  • 12. Your child has not accepted a phone call from an adult they met online.
  • 13. Your child does not communicate online with adults you do not know.
  • 14. Your child does not isolate in his or her room while online.
  • 15. Your child does not visit chat rooms without an adult’s permission or trained chat room moderator.
  • 16. Your child does not engage without permission in online activity in their room.
  • 17. Your child has not engaged in online activities they have been restricted from by a parent or trusted adult.
  • 18. Your child knows to log out if they feel uncomfortable or fearful.
  • 19. Your child does not engage in online activities they would not want an adult to know about.
  • 20. Your child would not meet anyone they met online without you or a trusted adult’s permission.

iPredator Internet Safety Tools

Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.

Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D. is a New York State licensed psychologist and certified forensic consultant. He completed his doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology in 1994 from Adler University in Chicago, Illinois. In November 2011, Dr. Nuccitelli and his colleagues established iPredator Inc. offering educational, investigation and advisory services related to cyberstalking, cyberbullying, internet predators, cybercrime & the darkside of cyberspace. In June 2013, Dr. Nuccitelli and iPredator Inc. launched this internet safety website, iPredator, and two blogs, Dark Psychology & Dr. Internet Safety. These sites offer online users an incredible amount of information, education and advisory services. Since 1985, Dr. Nuccitelli has worked in behavioral healthcare in a variety of capacities with various clinical populations.

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iPredator Inc.

iPredator Inc. is a New York State based Internet Safety Company founded in September 2011 to provide educational and advisory products & services to online users and organizations. Their areas of expertise include cyberbullying, cyberstalking, cybercrime, internet defamation, cyber terrorism, online predation, internet addiction and the new fields they are pioneering called Cybercriminal Psychology & Profiling. Created by a NYS licensed psychologist and certified forensic consultant, Michael Nuccitelli Psy.D., their goal is to reduce victimization, theft and disparagement from online assailants.

Dr. Nuccitelli and iPredator Inc. consultants are always available, at no cost, to interact with online users and media. In addition to their professional services, Dr. Nuccitelli has authored a variety of internet safety tools, cyber attack risk assessments and diagnostic tests available to purchase as hard copy PDF files.

Although iPredator Inc. has joined a multitude of social networking sites, feel free to visit the social sites listed below they use as their information and announcement vehicles. If you have questions, feel free to call iPredator Inc. anytime in New York at (347) 871-2416 or by sending correspondence using this website’s contact page by clicking here: Contact Us Dr. Nuccitelli or an iPredator Inc. associate return all contacts within 24 hours.

“The Information Age technocentric concept of being “connected” is a paradox of disconnection causing us to lose control of our instinctual drives for social cohesion, allegiance and selflessness. As our dependency upon Information and Communications Technology (ICT) grows, spreading throughout our collective human consciousness, the less we care for our neighbors and the more we delude ourselves into thinking that online connections are far more valuable than reality based relationships.” Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D. (2014)

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Author: Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.
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Published by iPredator Inc.
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Publisher: iPredator
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iPredator Inc. is a New York based Internet Safety Company founded to provide products and services addressing cyberbullying, cyber harassment, cyberstalking, cybercrime, internet defamation, cyber terrorism, online predation and online deception. Created by a NYS licensed psychologist and certified forensic consultant, Michael Nuccitelli Psy.D., their goal is to reduce victimization, theft and disparagement from online assailants.
New York
US
Phone: 347-871-2416

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