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100 Internet Safety Tips

100 Internet Safety Tips for Parents:: iPredator Inc. presents 100 Internet safety tips for parents to use when educating your child on reducing their chances of being harmed online, engaging in high-risk online activities & allowing offline distress to impact their online behavior. The tips are phrased in the “You and your child” tense. To encourage your child to experience interest in what they are likely to initially view as a mundane task, phrasing the tips in this manner makes them a team approach and not a one-sided parent/child task.

The compiled internet safety tips were compiled and formatted from the extensive research invested in the design of Dr. Nuccitelli’s Information Age Forensics construct, iPredator. The definition is as follows:

iPredator

iPredator: A person, group or nation who, directly or indirectly, engages in exploitation, victimization, coercion, stalking, theft or disparagement of others using Information and Communications Technology [ICT]. iPredators are driven by deviant fantasies, desires for power and control, retribution, religious fanaticism, political reprisal, psychiatric illness, perceptual distortions, peer acceptance or personal and financial gain. iPredators can be any age or gender and are not bound by economic status, race, religion or national heritage. iPredator is a global term used to distinguish anyone who engages in criminal, coercive, deviant or abusive behaviors using ICT. Central to the construct is the premise that Information Age criminals, deviants and the violently disturbed are psychopathological classifications new to humanity.

Whether the offender is a cyberstalker, cyber harasser, cybercriminal, online sexual predator, internet troll, cyber terrorist, cyberbully, online child pornography consumer/distributor or engaged in internet defamation or nefarious online deception, they fall within the scope of iPredator. The three criteria used to define an iPredator include:

  • A self-awareness of causing harm to others, directly or indirectly, using ICT.
  • The usage of ICT to obtain, exchange and deliver harmful information.
  • A general understanding of Cyberstealth used to engage in criminal or deviant activities or to profile, identify, locate, stalk and engage a target.

Unlike human predators prior to the Information Age, iPredators rely upon the multitude of benefits offered by Information and Communications Technology [ICT]. These assistances include exchange of information over long distances, rapidity of information exchanged and the seemingly infinite access to data available. Malevolent in intent, iPredators habitually deceive others using ICT in the abstract and artificial electronic universe known as cyberspace. Therefore, as the internet naturally offers all ICT users anonymity, if they decide, iPredators actively design online profiles and diversionary tactics to remain undetected and untraceable.

Cyberstealth, a sub-tenet of iPredator, is a covert method by which iPredators attempt to establish and sustain complete anonymity while they engage in ICT activities planning their next assault, investigating innovative surveillance technologies or researching the social profiles of their next target. Concurrent with the concept of Cyberstealth is iPredator Victim Intuition [IVI], an iPredator’s IVI is their aptitude to sense a target’s ODDOR [Offline Distress Dictates Online Response], online & offline vulnerabilities, psychological weaknesses, technological limitations, increasing their success of a cyber-attack with minimal ramifications.

“Malevolent in intent, iPredators rely on their capacity to deceive others using information technology in the abstract and artificial electronic universe known as cyberspace. Therefore, as the internet naturally offers all ICT users anonymity, if they decide, iPredators actively design online profiles and diversionary tactics to remain undetected and untraceable.”  Michael Nuccitelli Psy.D. C.F.C., iPredator Inc. (2013)

Some of the items listed may not apply to your child based on their age, maturational development and access to all types of electronic devices. When completing the checklist, correct responses are affirmative and should be “Yes, Agree, True.” Of the items that do apply to you, your child and family, the goal is to correctly agree to 95% of the items. Achieving a 95% correct response score suggests you and your child are in the low probability for cyber attack range.

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Internet Safety Tips for Parents

  • 1. You and your child discuss cyber bullying and/or cyber harassment issues.
  • 2. You and your child know to ignore being harassed or teased online.
  • 3. You and your child do not flame (a provoking message) others online.
  • 4. You and your child will always be supportive if a friend is being cyber bullied or cyber harassed.
  • 5. You and your child know who, when and how to report a cyberbully, cyberstalker or cyber harasser.
  • 6. You and your child refrain from posting or sharing images or videos online that are even slightly embarrassing.
  • 7. You and your child practice digital citizenship (online manners.)
  • 8. You and your child know what to do if taunted online.
  • 9. You and your child do not post or share offensive information or images online.
  • 10. You and your child are cautious posting personal information online.
  • 11. You and your child check your “digital footprint.”
  • 12. You and your child do not share private information to ex-friends ex-partners online.
  • 13. You and your child practice caution what is disclosed online.
  • 14. You and your child protect your images from strangers viewing them online.
  • 15. You and your child know how to sustain and monitor a positive digital reputation.
  • 16. You and your child know images can remain in cyberspace for years.
  • 17. You and your child know information shared online may be impossible to delete.
  • 18. You and your child do not have a mobile device with information that is embarrassing.
  • 19. You and your child know sexting can be criminal & shared with others.
  • 20. You and your child know personal information posted or shared online can go viral.
  • 21. You and your child know everyone has a digital footprint.
  • 22. You and your child know images and videos can be reposted multiple times.
  • 23. You and your child know what information can be harmful to digital reputation.
  • 24. You and your child practice good behavior online and in chatrooms.
  • 25. You and your child do not share personal information using Twitter.
  • 26. You and your child check email and social media profiles for strange messages and posts.
  • 27. You and your child do not have sexual conversations with unknown online strangers.
  • 28. You and your child do not make phone calls to online strangers.
  • 29. You and your child would not meet someone in person met online without telling loved ones.
  • 30. You and your child do not respond to anyone not known in chat rooms.
  • 31. You and your child do not open an attachments sent from an online stranger.
  • 32. You and your child do not discuss financial information with online strangers.
  • 33. You and your child know to log out if feeling uncomfortable or fearful.
  • 34. You and your child do not engage in online activities not approved of by loved ones.
  • 35. You and your child would not meet anyone met online without first telling a trusted adult.
  • 36. You and your child know they are at a higher risk being contacted by online strangers at night.
  • 37. You and your child do not discuss sexual topics with online strangers.
  • 38. You and your child do not accept free software, ring tones or screen savers from online strangers.
  • 39. You and your child do not have names on “buddy” or “friends” lists you do not know.
  • 40. You and your child do not send personal information to others you do not know.
  • 41. You and your child do not disclose passwords with others met online.
  • 42. You and your child do not text message or chat about sex online.
  • 43. You and your child know that internet predators target online users using kindness and understanding.
  • 44. You and your child know internet predators use attention, affection and gifts to seduce online users.
  • 45. You and your child know peer-to-peer networks can expose computers to internet predators.
  • 46. You and your child know the best protection from internet predators are safe online communication and digital citizenship.
  • 47. You and your child know how to block sites on computers from being accessed by internet predators.
  • 48. You and your child know most internet predators will be encouraging, patient and reserved.
  • 49. You and your child know file-sharing sites allow internet predators to access portions of a computer.
  • 50. You and your child know internet predators encourage online users to share images online.

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Internet Safety Tips for Kids

  • 51. You and your child know internet predators encourage online users to share private information.
  • 52. You and your child know how to prevent unwanted access to the mobile devices.
  • 53. You and your child know how to track the sending of digital photos from mobile devices.
  • 54. If you or your child has a home WiFi system, you always run additional firewalls.
  • 55. You and your child are educated on the dangers of GPS location services.
  • 56. You and your child know GPS location services allow anyone to know the exact location of the owner of the mobile phone.
  • 57. You or your child has contacted mobile device services about adult controls and/or security settings.
  • 58. You and your child spend time learning mobile device safety.
  • 59. You and your child know how to install security on mobile devices.
  • 60. You and your child know how to set up remote lock and wipe features in mobile devices.
  • 61. You and your child monitor the stored images on mobile devices.
  • 62. You and your child have downloaded and installed antivirus software on mobile devices.
  • 63. You and your child treat mobile devices as carefully as wallets.
  • 64. You and your child do not share private information on mobile devices.
  • 65. You and your child silence mobile devices in public places.
  • 66. You and your child comply with work or school policies regarding mobile device usage.
  • 67. You and your child know there are few methods of filtering web content on mobile devices.
  • 68. You and your child learn about the dangers of GPS location services.
  • 69. You and your child know GPS location services allow anyone to know the owner’s exact location.
  • 70. You and your child do not share passwords with close friends.
  • 71. You and your child know to have multiple passwords.
  • 72. You and your child are familiar with bot software, spyware, keystroke loggers and viruses.
  • 73. You and your child know how to set a computer’s security settings on high.
  • 74. You and your child are familiar with home wireless networks (WiFi) and security settings.
  • 75. You and your child do not participate in online activities others would not approve of.
  • 76. You and your child do not click a link in an unknown email or instant message.
  • 77. You and your child do not click on the links in the video comments section.
  • 78. You and your child do not post home or cell phone numbers on social networking sites.
  • 79. You and your child know to be cautious sharing contact information on gaming sites.
  • 80. You and your child do not exchange images from someone met online.
  • 81. You and your child always log off when not using instant messaging.
  • 82. You and your child know about the dangers of disclosing personal information online.
  • 83. You and your child have confirmed your school or work websites are password protected.
  • 84. You and your child are cautious posting email addresses to prevent screen scrapers.
  • 85. You and your child do not include full or partial real names in user or screen names.
  • 86. You and your child do not post full name or addresses on public website.
  • 87. You and your child post other images when encouraged to post personal images.
  • 88. You and your child do not post full name, home address or telephone number on friend’s social profiles.
  • 89. You and your child use various email addresses for different purposes.
  • 90. You and your child do not include contact information in profiles or comments.
  • 91. You and your child only download legal files, music and videos.
  • 92. You and your child know whom to contact if being sexually solicited online.
  • 93. You and your child do not have a social media profile with sensitive information available to the public.
  • 94. You and your child do not share your social media profile passwords.
  • 95. You and your child are cautious of flattering messages received online.
  • 96. You and your child keep social profile pages “friends only” for inviting friends or loved ones.
  • 97. You and your child spend time learning proper online etiquette.
  • 98. You and your child review the privacy and security settings on social media sites.
  • 99. You and your child do not post personal images on websites or social networking profiles.
  • 100. You and your child refrain from responding to strange email messages or IM’s from social media accounts.

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CYBERBULLYING SPECIFIC IPREDATOR SITE PAGES

CYBERBULLY TRIAD

The Cyberbullying Triad is a term used to describe the 3 typologies of children that harm other children using Information Technology. This writer’s terms to categorize cyberbullies include the Ignorant Cyberbully, Righteous Cyberbully & Narcissistic Cyberbully. Of the three profiles, the Narcissistic Cyberbully is the most problematic having the highest probability of engaging in malevolent and nefarious online activities as an adult.

https://www.ipredator.co/cyberbully-triad/

CYBERBULLY MIND

Cyberbullying is defined as the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the commission of verbal and/or physical attacks, by one or more children towards another child, who is unable or unwilling to deescalate the engagement. Given that the vast majority of this abuse occurs in cyberspace, the factors, drives and motivations for cyberbullying are extremely complex. Provided is a brief introduction to the psychodynamics of cyberbullying and the cyberbully mind.

https://www.ipredator.co/cyberbully-minds/

CYBERBULLYING TACTICS

Cyberbullying continues to grow devastating both pre-pubescent and adolescent children. Unlike pre-Information Age bullying, cyberbullies and their tactics are primarily designed and instituted in the hidden realm of cyberspace. No one knows the depths Information Age children will venture in their practices to harm other children. NYS Licensed Psychologist, Dr. Michael Nuccitelli has published his 2015 Cyberbullying Tactics for review and free download.

https://www.ipredator.co/cyberbullying-examples/

CYBERBULLYING FACTS

Cyberbullying facts, prevention education tips & resources are presented for download, at no cost, for parents, educators & pediatric professionals. Author of the Information Age Forensics construct, iPredator, Dr. Nuccitelli has compiled helpful information regarding both the cyberbully and cyberbully victim. Given that a significant segment of cyberbullies fit criteria for iPredator, he also presents his formal definitions for Dark Psychology, Cyberstealth, iPredator Bridge & Cyberstealth.

https://www.ipredator.co/cyberbullying-facts/

Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.

Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D. is a New York State licensed psychologist and certified forensic consultant. He completed his doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology in 1994 from Adler University in Chicago, Illinois. In November 2011, Dr. Nuccitelli and his colleagues established iPredator Inc. offering educational, investigation and advisory services related to cyberstalking, cyberbullying, internet predators, cybercrime & the darkside of cyberspace. In June 2013, Dr. Nuccitelli and iPredator Inc. launched this internet safety website, iPredator, and two blogs, Dark Psychology & Dr. Internet Safety. These sites offer online users an incredible amount of information, education and advisory services. Since 1985, Dr. Nuccitelli has worked in behavioral healthcare in a variety of capacities with various clinical populations.

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iPredator Inc.

iPredator Inc. is a New York State based Internet Safety Company founded in September 2011 to provide educational and advisory products & services to online users and organizations. Their areas of expertise include cyberbullying, cyberstalking, cybercrime, internet defamation, cyber terrorism, online predation, internet addiction and the new fields they are pioneering called Cybercriminal Psychology & Profiling. Created by a NYS licensed psychologist and certified forensic consultant, Michael Nuccitelli Psy.D., their goal is to reduce victimization, theft and disparagement from online assailants.

Dr. Nuccitelli and iPredator Inc. consultants are always available, at no cost, to interact with online users and media. In addition to their professional services, Dr. Nuccitelli has authored a variety of internet safety tools, cyber attack risk assessments and diagnostic tests available to purchase as hard copy PDF files.

Although iPredator Inc. has joined a multitude of social networking sites, feel free to visit the social sites listed below they use as their information and announcement vehicles. Dr. Nuccitelli and iPredator Inc. consultants are always available, at no cost, to interact with academia, law enforcement, legal professionals and the media.

If you have questions, feel free to call iPredator Inc. anytime at (347) 871-2416 in New York or by sending correspondence using this website’s contact page by clicking on this link: Contact Us Dr. Nuccitelli or an iPredator Inc. associate return all contacts within 24 hours.

“The Information Age technocentric concept of being “connected” is a paradox of disconnection causing us to lose control of our instinctual drives for social cohesion, allegiance and selflessness. As our dependency upon Information and Communications Technology (ICT) grows, spreading throughout our collective human consciousness, the less we care for our neighbors and the more we delude ourselves into thinking that online connections are far more valuable than reality based relationships.” Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D. (2014)

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Author: Michael Nuccitelli, Psy.D.
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Published by iPredator Inc.
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Publisher: iPredator
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iPredator Inc. is a New York based Internet Safety Company founded to provide products and services addressing cyberbullying, cyber harassment, cyberstalking, cybercrime, internet defamation, cyber terrorism, online predation and online deception. Created by a NYS licensed psychologist and certified forensic consultant, Michael Nuccitelli Psy.D., their goal is to reduce victimization, theft and disparagement from online assailants.
New York
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Phone: 347-871-2416

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