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INTERNET ADDICTION RISK CHECKLIST

IARC Internet Addiction Risk Checklist Internet Use Disorder iPredator Text Image Internet Addiction | Internet Addiction Risk Checklist | iPredator

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Internet Addiction Use Disorder

Internet Addiction Risk Checklist

iPredator Inc.

Internet Addiction Risk Checklist (IARC): The Internet Addiction Risk Checklist (IARC) is a 100- item risk assessment designed to investigate if an Information and Communications Technology (ICT) user is engaging in pathological use of the internet and ICT. The checklist statements have been categorized into cognitive, affective, behavioral and perceptual sections all themed surrounding the compulsive dependent use of digital devices. The IARC can be taken as a self-assessment and when assessing others. Although the IARC is a general assessment for pathological ICT usage, supplement items have been added to focus on the areas of Cyber Sex, Cyber Relationship, Gaming & Online Commerce, Information Implosion & Dark Side ICT usage.

Internet Abuse & Internet Dependence Definitions

Internet Abuse: Internet Abuse (aka Internet Addiction & Internet Use Gaming Disorder) is an umbrella concept defining a child or adult’s compulsive and progressive abuse of the internet and electronic devices designed to obtain, exchange or disseminate information. Although the internet is the predominate arena in which Internet Abuse takes place, electronic devices and communications channels not internet enabled are also included in the definition.

Internet Abuse causes dysfunctional cognitive, affective, behavioral & perceptual intrapersonal consequences accompanied with employment, academic, familial, peer & intimate partner interpersonal consequences. On a continuum of severity, ranging from absent to mild, cessation of Internet and/or electronic device usage causes withdrawal symptomology, psychological and/or physiological, combined with perceptual tolerance. Also on a continuum of severity, Internet Abusive online users engage in criminal, deviant and/or deceptive online activities ranging from absent to severe.

The chronic and more debilitating condition, Internet Dependence, is more chronic, severe and self-destructive. Internet Abuse is segmented into six typologies as follows: Cyber Sex Fixated, Cyber Relationship Fixated, Internet Gaming & Online Commerce Fixated, Information Implosion Fixated, Dark Side Fixated and NOS (Not Otherwise Specified) Fixated. The NOS Fixated typology applies to internet abusing online users who share more than one typology, has a co-existing mental illness or medical condition causing psychiatric dysfunction.

Internet Dependence: Internet Dependence (aka Internet Addiction & Internet Use Gaming Disorder) is an umbrella concept defining a child or adult’s compulsive and progressive dependency upon the internet and electronic devices designed to obtain, exchange or disseminate information. Although the internet is the predominate arena in which Internet Dependence takes place, electronic devices and communications channels not internet enabled are also included in the definition. Internet Dependence causes dysfunctional cognitive, affective, behavioral & perceptual intrapersonal consequences accompanied with employment, academic, familial, peer & intimate partner interpersonal consequences.

On a continuum of severity, ranging from mild to severe, cessation of Internet and/or electronic device usage causes withdrawal symptomology, psychological and/or physiological, combined with perceptual tolerance. Also on a continuum of severity, Internet Dependent online users engage in criminal, deviant and/or deceptive online activities ranging from mild to severe.

The mild and less debilitating condition, Internet Abuse, is not as chronic, severe or self- destructive. Internet Dependence is segmented into six typologies as follows: Cyber Sex Fixated, Cyber Relationship Fixated, Internet Gaming & Online Commerce Fixated, Information Implosion Fixated, Dark Side Fixated and NOS (Not Otherwise Specified) Fixated. The NOS Fixated typology applies to internet dependent online users who share more than one typology, has a co-existing mental illness or medical condition causing psychiatric dysfunction.

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Note: Responding “Yes, I Agree, True” to any of the statements provided in the IARC does not confirm you or the person being queried meets a formal definition of Internet Addiction or Internet Use Disorder (IUD.) In fact, as of May 2013, there is no widely accepted formal definition of Internet Addiction or a widely accepted clinically validated set of diagnostic criteria. The purpose of the IARC is to be used as a screening tool, data collection technique and educational blueprint. The correct responses to each of the IARC items should be “No, I Disagree, False.”

IARC ITEM DEFINITIONS

I. ICT:  The acronym, ICT, stands for Information and Communications Technology. Information is an umbrella term representing all forms of telecommunication, information technology, broadcast media, audio and video processing, transmission, the internet and non-internet enabled electronic devices.

II. Habitual: The term “habitual” is a qualitative word representing frequent usage of ICT. The term “habitual,” being a qualitative term, means that the IARC respondent may have varying interpretations of what frequent usage of ICT means. For purposes of the IARC, the definition of the term “habitual” is defined as “a fixed pattern,” “daily routine” or “persistent” behavior(s). It should be noted that the term does not imply a physical dependence upon the internet, but represents a routine behavior that may or may not be perceived by the subject as compulsive.

As stated above, responding “Yes, I Agree, True” to any of the statements does not confirm you or the person being queried meets a formal definition of Internet Addiction or a widely accepted clinically validated set of diagnostic criteria. However, affirmative responses to ten or more of the statements are a strong indicator that you or the person being queried may be suffering from an Internet Addiction (aka Internet Use Disorder.)

Internet Addiction Synonyms: Internet Addiction Disease, Internet Addiction Syndrome, Cybersexual Addiction, Cyber-Relational Addiction, Net Compulsions, Information Overload, Internet Use Disorder, Internet Addiction Disorder, Internet Addict, Internet Dependent, Computer Addiction, Web Addiction, Online Addiction, Net Addiction, Internet Junkie, Internet Gaming Addiction, Technology Addiction, Internet Abuse, Web Addiction, Internet Pornography Addiction, Internet Porn Addiction, Pathological Internet Use, Computer Game Addiction, Internet Addiction Disease, Internet Addiction Syndrome, Internet Usage Disorder, Internet Dependency Disorder, Problematic Internet Use.

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Checklist Directions

Internet Addiction Risk Checklist (IARC)

1. To complete the checklist, you are required to respond to each statement with 1 of 4 choices as follows:

  • A. Y__ (Yes, Agree, True)
  • B. N__ (No, Disagree, False)
  • C. IDK__ (I Do Not Know, I Did Not Know, I Am Unsure)
  • D. DNA__ (Does Not Apply, Not Applicable, Not Relevant)

3. Only answer “Yes” or “No” to statements you are positive about or almost certain in your decision with minimal doubt.

4. If there is a statement you do not understand, respond with choice D. DNA__ (Does Not Apply, Not Applicable, Not Relevant)

5. If there is a statement that does not apply to you or the subject being queried, respond with choice D. DNA__ (Does Not Apply, Not Applicable, Not Relevant). For example, if a checklist statement discusses mobile devices, but you do not own a mobile device, you would respond with choice D. Does Not Apply, Not Applicable or Not Relevant.

6. Please provide a response to each statement with 1 of the 4 responses before calculating your final score. The IARC has been designed to make scoring easy to compile. Simply add up your correct responses (+1) along with (+1) for your D. DNA__ (Does Not Apply, Not Applicable, Not Relevant) responses and use the score key below the checklist to check your score.

7. Prior to taking the checklist, please review to the two definitions listed below and refer back to them is needed. The definition of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) and “Habitual” is as follows:

I. ICT: The acronym, ICT, stands for Information and Communications Technology. Information is an umbrella term representing all forms of telecommunication, information technology, broadcast media, audio and video processing, transmission, the internet and non-internet enabled electronic devices.

II. Habitual: The term “habitual” is a qualitative word representing frequent usage of ICT. The term “habitual,” being a qualitative term, means that the IARC respondent may have varying interpretations of what frequent usage of ICT means. For purposes of the IARC, the definition of the term “habitual” is defined as “a fixed pattern,” “daily routine” or “persistent” behavior(s). It should be noted that the term does not imply a physical dependence upon the internet, but represents a routine behavior that may or may not be perceived by the subject as compulsive.

8. Below the IARC are Internet Addiction subtype specific statements the respondent may choose to include. The subtypes include Cyber Sex, Cyber Relationship, Gaming & Online Commerce, Information Accessibility & Dark Side ICT. Each subtype specific includes ten items and are calculated in the final score.

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CORRECT RESPONSES TO ALL IARC ITEMS ARE NO, DISAGREE, FALSE OR DOES NOT APPLY.

ADD +1 FOR EACH “NO” RESPONSE AND +1 FOR EACH “DOES NOT APPLY” RESPONSE. UPON COMPLETION,  TALLY THESE TWO AMOUNTS AND COMPARE YOUR FINAL SCORE TO THE SCORING KEY BELOW.  

INTERNET ADDICTION RISK CHECKLIST

IARC Internet Addiction Risk Checklist Internet Use Disorder iPredator Text Image Internet Addiction | Internet Addiction Risk Checklist | iPredator

Subjects Gender: Male__ Female__ N/A__

Age: Teen (18-20) __Young Adult (21-25) __Adult (26+) __Business__

Average Daily Online Activity: 0-1 Hour__1-3 Hours__3-5 Hours__5+ Hours__

A. Y__ (Yes, Agree, True)
B. N__ (No, Disagree, False)
C. IDK__ (I Do Not Know, I Did Not Know, I Am Unsure)
D. DNA__ (Does Not Apply, Not Applicable, Not Relevant)

COGNITIVE

  • 1. You or the subject use thoughts of ICT usage to block out disturbing thoughts about life.
  • 2. You or the subject thinks more ICT usage time helps when feeling negative or frustrated.
  • 3. You or the subject thinks habitually interacting with a group of online contacts never met in person is not a problem.
  • 4. You or the subject habitually thinks about future ICT usage.
  • 5. You or the subject thinks habitually using private codes or lingo with a select group of online contacts is not a problem.
  • 6. You or the subject are having concentration difficulties, memory problems and time awareness distortions due to ICT usage.
  • 7. You or the subject thinks quickly deleting online information if friends, loved ones or coworkers unexpectedly walks in is not a problem.
  • 8. You or the subject thinks habitually posting online information, considered by others, as cryptic or jumbled is not a problem.
  • 9. You or the subject thinks about the negative consequences being caused by internet addiction, but minimize the consequences.
  • 10. You or the subject thinks habitually posting derogatory online information about others is not a problem.
  • 11. You or the subject thinks about internet addiction, but does no not seek help or consult with a loved one.
  • 12. You or the subject thinks habitually posting online information about others, without their consent or knowledge, is not a problem.
  • 13. You or the subject thinks habitually using a private online identity that is not for internet safety purposes is not a problem.
  • 14. You or the subject thinks habitually responding to contacts from online strangers is not a problem.
  • 15. You or the subject thinks habitually discussing with online contacts violent, prejudicial or hate based topics is not a problem.
  • 16. You or the subject have thoughts of a boring life existence if online activities are stopped, curtailed or hampered in any way other than complete freedom.
  • 17. You or the subject thinks habitually participating in anonymous video or instant messaging chat room sites is not a problem.
  • 18. You or the subject thinks ignoring important responsibilities because of ICT usage is not a problem.
  • 19. You or the subject thinks hiding compulsive ICT usage from friends and relatives is not a problem.
  • 20. You or the subject thinks about ways to deceive friends, family members or co-workers about the actual cost and time of ICT involvement.
  • 21. You or the subject habitually thinks about ways to use ICT for  longer periods without considering the consequences.
  • 22. You or the subject thinks neglecting academic, work or household chores to spend more time online is not a problem.
  • 23. You or the subject thinks being online is preferable to intimacy with a significant other.
  • 24. You or the subject thinks forming new relationships with online users is just as important as establishing offline relationships.
  • 25. You or the subject thinks, when others complain about the amount of time spent online, it is not a problem or they are exaggerating.

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INTERNET ADDICTION INTERNET USE DISORDER IPREDATOR TEXT IMAGE Internet Addiction | Internet Addiction Risk Checklist | iPredator

A. Y__ (Yes, Agree, True)
B. N__ (No, Disagree, False)
C. IDK__ (I Do Not Know, I Did Not Know, I Am Unsure)
D. DNA__ (Does Not Apply, Not Applicable, Not Relevant)

AFFECTIVE

  • 26. You or the subject feels ICT usage is required to feel “normal” or satisfied.
  • 27. You or the subject has feelings of guilt, shame, fear, sadness or anger when ICT is unavailable.
  • 28. You or the subject feels aroused when discussing past and future ICT activities.
  • 29. You or the subject becomes restless, moody, depressed or irritable when attempting to curtail ICT usage.
  • 30. You or the subject has feelings of guilt, shame, anxiety or depression from habitual ICT usage.
  • 31. You or the subject feels frustrated, angry, tense & depressed when ICT is inaccessible.
  • 32. You or the subject feels secure when engaging in ICT usage at intervals that are more frequent.
  • 33. You or the subject feels a loss of control related to habitual ICT usage.
  • 34. You or the subject has “craving” feelings when ICT is not accessible.
  • 35. You or the subject feels strongly about needing to engage in ICT activities.
  • 36. You or the subject feels a sense of loss when having to stop ICT usage.
  • 37. You or the subject experience anxiety feelings when ICT becomes inoperable.
  • 38. You or the subject feels ICT usage will always alleviate negative emotions.
  • 39. You or the subject uses the internet to escape or relieve a depressed mood (e.g. feelings of helplessness, guilt, anxiety).
  • 40. You or the subject feels anxiety, irritability, boredom or depression after several days without internet activity.
  • 41. You or the subject feels less depressed, moody or nervous immediately after getting back online.
  • 42. You or the subject feels aroused when fantasizing about being online.
  • 43. You or the subject feels joyful anticipation and excitement just prior to going online.
  • 44. You or the subject feels annoyed if bothered online.
  • 45. You or the subject secretly fears that life without the Internet would be empty, and joyless.
  • 46. You or the subject feels passionate about a religious, political or societal movement and online activities take priority over responsibilities.
  • 47. You or the subject feels passionate about a religious, political or societal movement and spends increasingly greater amounts of time online.
  • 48. You are the subject feels hesitant to discuss family, career or offline information to online contacts that could lead to identification.
  • 49. You or the subject feels pride and satisfaction using ICT to obtain people’s identity that was previously unknown.
  • 50. You or the subject does not feel embarrassed contacting others online without a clear reason or obvious connection.

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